INFORMATION SHARING

The sharing of information is key to making sure Channel partners have the knowledge they need to provide the best support to vulnerable individuals.

Below is a list of some of the types of data that may be shared about an individual vulnerable to radicalisation.

Click on the data to understand why it may be relevant.

 

NAME
Once a referral reaches Channel the name of the individual must be included – it is the most expedient way to cross-check whether other concerns have been raised about the individual, avoiding any chance of speculation or confusion.

 

DATE OF BIRTH
It is important to know which partner agencies may be called on for support, and that could be dependent on whether the individual is a minor.

 

GENDER
Useful for deciding what resources can be brought to bear for support, and may also determine the gender of those asked to have interactions with the vulnerable individual.

 

ADDRESS
Geography can play a part in the parts of society an individual is regularly exposed to, and in some cases this could be impacting on the risk of a person’s radicalisation.

 

ETHNICITY
This can be especially relevant when the person at risk is transitioning across cultural groups; radicalisers can exploit a lack of knowledge or a sense of isolation and exclusion.

 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS
There are a number of reasons this is very useful information to have at this stage.

These may be practical – e.g. in cases when considering a minor – or in determining if the vulnerable individual is isolated or excluded; or in seeing if there is a proximity to known persons with extremist views, be that a family member or friend.

 

SUBSTANCE MISUSE
There are examples of where substance misuse is exploited by radicalisers to bring about a sense of guilt or debt in the vulnerable individual.

In some cases, substance misuse exacerbates mental health issues for the vulnerable individual which can increase their risk of radicalisation.

 

EMOTIONAL HEALTH
It is useful to know if the vulnerable individual is in a state of personal crisis – they may be asking for help, or it may make them susceptible to extremist messaging.

In many cases, a sense of injustice; loss; isolation; grief; anger; and low self-esteem can increase the risk of radicalisation.

 

MENTAL HEALTH
The important consideration here is to think about what is “risk relevant,” so what information could explain either behaviours that cause concern in relation to radicalisation, or exacerbate any process or risk of radicalisation?

Knowing what these factors are can be vital in finding the right support, and also in sensibly discussing the situation with the vulnerable individual themselves. There are instances where the person understands the period of concern as an episode in their mental health, and does not carry those extremist views or feelings forward.

 

CULTURAL FACTORS
In a multicultural society, the groups or beliefs that people align themselves to can be extremely important to them and their identity.

Supposed expectations, roles, and responsibilities can become aligned to this, and exploited in the radicalisation process.

Lack of knowledge, a feeling of exclusion, and senses of injustice can often be tied to perceived cultural circumstances.

 

FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
For many, family is the most important support network that would help challenge and counter the process of radicalisation, and so a breakdown or upheaval in the family dynamic may explain a risk concern.

However, in the minority of cases, it may also be the very network that supports it.

 

OFFENDING HISTORY
The important consideration here is to think about what is “risk relevant,” so what information could explain either behaviours that cause concern in relation to radicalisation, or exacerbate any process or risk of radicalisation?

Links to criminality are often seen in cases of radicalisation where individuals are more willing to break the law in order to support a group, cause or ideology.

A criminal history can create a sense of guilt for a radicaliser to exploit. And in some cases, it may mean the vulnerable individual has been exposed to TACT offenders.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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